Displaying 43 results

8A: Review applications and procedures

Individuals or organisations may submit a request for review of a decision of the Bar Standards Board, and a further appeal to the High Court, in line with the Bar Qualification Rules (Rules Q35-Q40). This section includes information on requests for review of decisions of the Bar Standards Board, the Bar Council Records Office, the Inns of Court, and the Inns’ Conduct Committee (ICC). Bar Qualification Rules

BSB Handbook

Rule Q35 Where provision is made under this Section for a review by the BSB of a decision, any request for such a review must be accompanied by:

.1    a copy of any notice of the decision and the reasons for it received by the person requesting the review (“the applicant”);

.2    where the decision is a decision of an Inn or the ICC, copies of all documents submitted or received by the applicant which were before the Inn or the ICC;

.3    any further representations and evidence which the applicant wishes the BSB to take into account; and

.4    payment of such fee or fees as may be prescribed.

Rule Q36 Where the decision under review is a decision of an Inn, the BSB will invite the Inn to comment on any further representations and evidence which the applicant submits under Rule Q35.3.

Rule Q37 On a review under this Section the BSB:

.1    may affirm the decision under review or substitute any other decision which could have been made on the original application;

.2    may in an appropriate case reimburse the fee paid under Rule Q35.4; and

.3    will inform the applicant and any other interested person of its decision and the reasons for it.

Rule Q38 Where provision is made under this Section for a review of a decision by the BSB, this review may be delegated to an Independent Decision-Making Panel, where specified by the BSB.

Rule Q39 Where under this Section provision is made for a review by the BSB of a decision, no appeal may be made to the High Court unless such a review has taken place.

Rule Q40 An individual who is adversely affected by a decision of the BSB under Section B.2 may appeal to the High Court against the decision. 

  Overview 1  You may submit a request for review to us up to one month after notification of the original decision (eg the date of the relevant decision letter). Independent Decision-making Body 2  The Independent Decision-making Body (IDB) is a non-executive body with responsibility for taking all regulatory decisions that require ...

9B: Amendments

The Bar Qualification Manual was first published on 1 April 2019. An updated and reformatted version of the entire manual was published on 9 November 2020. The table below will include details of amendments made to the Bar Qualification Manual after 9 November 2020 by section number/page title and by date. Date Section Number and Page Title Details of Amendments 17/11/2020 Part 3D - Centralised Assessments Amended link at paragraph 3 to 2020 version of standard setting technique document. 14/12/2020 Part 7A - Types of transferring lawyers Added links to new online application for transferring qualified lawyers via MyBar (para 5). 17/12/2020   Part 7A - Types of transferring lawyers Added links to new online application guidelines and amended 'valid to' dates ...

6C: Authorisation of current pupillage training organisations (PTOs) as AETOs

This section explains the process for current Pupillage Training Organisations to gain authorisation as an AETO. Bar Qualification Rules

BSB Handbook

Rule Q29 Providers of vocational training and pupillage must be authorised by the BSB as an AETO.

Rule Q30 An application to become an AETO must be made in such form and be accompanied by payment of such fee or fees as may be prescribed by the BSB.

Rule Q31 In determining an application from an applicant to become an AETO, the BSB will have regard to the Authorisation Framework and in particular the mandatory criteria. The BSB will not approve an application to become an AETO unless it is satisfied that it is:

.1 able to meet the mandatory criteria set out in the Authorisation Framework relevant to the application; and

.2 a suitable provider for the purposes of the Authorisation Framework.

Rule Q32 The BSB may grant authorisation to an AETO on such terms and conditions as it considers appropriate including the period of authorisation.

Rule Q33 The BSB may vary, amend, suspend or withdraw authorisation of an AETO in the following circumstances:

.1 the AETO has applied for such variation, amendment, suspension or withdrawal;

.2 the AETO ceases to exist, becomes insolvent or merges;

.3 the AETO fails to comply with conditions imposed upon its authorisation;

.4 the BSB is of the view that the AETO has failed or will fail to fulfil the mandatory requirements set out in the Authorisation Framework;

.5 the BSB is of the view that the AETO is not providing the training for which it was authorised to an adequate standard or there has been a material change in the training provided; or

.6 the BSB is of the view that the continued authorisation of the AETO would inhibit the Regulatory Objectives.

Rule Q34 An AETO which is dissatisfied by a decision in relation to Rule Q31 – Q33 above may apply to the BSB for a review.

  Overview 1  All current pupillage providers (ie those granted Pupillage Training Organisation (PTO) or Approved Training Organisation (ATO) status by us) intending to provide pupillage after 31 March 2021 must meet the criteria for authorisation set out in the Authorisation Framework . 2  To support the Authorisation Framework, we have published guidance for prospective AETOs providing the work-based learning (pupillage) component. 3  We have contacted all existing pupillage providers in due course to discuss how, and when, they will need to apply to be authorised as Authorised Education and Training Organisations (AETOs). 4  In the meantime, current PTOs can ...

3B: Bar Training Syllabi

This section includes links to download the course syllabi for the Bar Training Course. 1  The Bar Training syllabi documents are for use by Bar Training students and AETOs, and Bar Transfer Test candidates. Bar Training Civil Litigation Syllabus 2024 (Sep 2023 - White Book 2023 Version) and Tracked Changes version . Bar Training Criminal Litigation Syllabus 2024 (December 2023 - Blackstone's 2024 References Version) and Tracked Changes version Bar Training Criminal Litigation Syllabus 2024 (December 2023) Summary of changes 2  If you have any questions about the syllabi documents, you should contact your AETO.

3D: Exemptions and waivers (vocational)

This section includes information on exemptions and waivers from the vocational component of Bar training. Overview 1  Bar Training Courses under a number of different titles were introduced from September 2020. Details of these courses may be found on our website. 2  Bar Training Courses must be undertaken in their entirety. There are no partial waivers of these courses for prior learning or experience gained before starting the vocational component. However, you may be granted exemption from a Bar Training Course if you have qualified in another jurisdiction, or as a solicitor in England and Wales. This type of exemption will usually be conditional on passing sections of the Bar Transfer Test (see Part 7D  of this Bar Qualification Manual). 3 ...

3A: The Bar Training Course

This section includes information on the Bar Training Course, including entry requirements, an overview of the application process, the course providers, and key statistics. Overview - entry requirements 1 Applicants for a place on a Bar Training Course must: a. have completed the academic component of Bar training (see Part 2 of this Bar Qualification Manual); b. be a member of one of the Inns of Court (see Part 5A of this Bar Qualification Manual); and c. be fluent in English. 2  Please note that AETOs may impose additional selection criteria over and above the minimum requirements specified above. Please check the website of individual AETOs for more information about their entry requirements. English language requirement 3  The Professional Statement   ...

3C: Centralised assessments

This section includes information on the vocational component centralised assessments including what subjects are covered by the exams, what to do before the exams and on the day of sitting, marking and results, and the results review process. Contact: [email protected] Overview 1  Vocational component centralised examinations are set on our behalf by the Central Examination Board (CEB). The CEB consists of a group of senior examiners, including experienced legal practitioners and academics. Psychometric and examination experts support the work of the CEB. 2  Centralised examinations were introduced to ensure consistency across course providers, and closer regulatory oversight of standards in knowledge subjects. The following Bar Training subjects are centrally examined: Civil Litigation and Evidence; and Criminal Litigation, Evidence and Sentencing. ...

4J: Assessment of pupils and compulsory courses

This section includes information on the assessment of pupils throughout the work-based learning component (pupillage), secondments, and the compulsory courses to be completed during pupillage.

1. Using the Professional Statement to assess the competence of pupils

This section should be understood by AETOs, pupil supervisors and pupils. It covers the competences and standards that the BSB requires pupils to achieve and how they are assessed.

AETOs are required to assess pupils in line with the threshold standard and competences specified in the Professional Statement.
  1.1  The Professional Statement describes the knowledge skills and attributes that all barristers should have on “day one” of practice. The components of Bar training are designed to ensure that prospective barristers meet the threshold standards in the Professional Statement. It helps prospective barristers to understand the standards they need to meet, and it helps AETOs to understand what the outcomes of Bar training must be. 1.2  AETOs must assess their pupils in line with the threshold standard and competences specified in the Professional Statement. This is a change to the previous requirement ...

4E: Pupillage funding

All pupillages of self-employed barristers, chambers and BSB entities must be funded in accordance with the Pupillage Funding Rules in the BSB Handbook. The responsibility to fund pupils lies with the AETO. The purpose of these rules is to ensure that pupils receive a regular, minimum income throughout pupillage and it supports equality of opportunity. Other types of AETOs must abide by the National Living Wage legislation. Minimum pupillage funding requirements 1  All pupils must be paid no less than a minimum amount, specified by us. 2  The minimum pupillage award is set annually, having regard to the Living Wage Foundation’s hourly rate recommendations, which are announced in November each year. The annual increase applies from January each year to ...

4C: Fair recruitment and equality and diversity

All AETOs are required to abide by the Equality Act 2010 , which includes some specific provisions in relation to recruitment of pupils. In addition, our Handbook and the Authorisation Framework have a number of requirements relating to recruitment in relation to equality and the principles of flexibility, accessibility and affordability. These are outlined in this section. Concerns raised during our consultations about Bar training and from research conducted (covering diversity , barriers to training and differential attainment in outcomes on the BPTC and in gaining pupillage , race equality and experience of women at the Bar ) highlight that access to pupillage is one of the biggest barriers to increasing diversity at the Bar.  Research conducted into Pupillage Advertising and Selection ...

5A: Membership of an Inn of Court and student conduct

This section includes information on joining an Inn of Court, contact details for the Inns, Fit and Proper Person checks, student conduct, and support for pupils. Bar Qualification Rules

BSB Handbook

Rule Q3 To be called to the Bar by an Inn an individual must have successfully completed the following:

.1      academic legal training;

.2      vocational training;

.3      the number of qualifying sessions as a student member of an Inn as prescribed from time to time by the BSB; and

.4      pay such fee or fees as may be prescribed.

Rule Q6 The BSB shall set out in writing:

.1      the requirements to be met by an Inn in admitting student members and calling individuals to the Bar;

.2      the manner in which an Inn shall assess whether such individuals are fit and proper; and

.3         the minimum requirements for the delivery of qualifying sessions by an Inn.
  Overview 1  The Inns of Court ("Inns") alone have the power to Call a student to the Bar. Only those Called to the Bar are able to exercise rights of audience in the superior courts of England and Wales as barristers.                            2  The Inns are professional membership associations for barristers in England and Wales, dedicated to promoting the rule of law and providing education and training to their student and barrister members. Joining an Inn of Court 3  You must be admitted as student member of an Inn in ...

5C: Call to the Bar

This section includes information on the requirements for Call to the Bar of England and Wales. Bar Qualification Rules

BSB Handbook

Rule Q3 To be called to the Bar by an Inn an individual must have successfully completed the following:

.1    academic legal training;

.2    vocational training;

.3    the number of qualifying sessions as a student member of an Inn as prescribed from time to time by the BSB; and

.4    pay such fee or fees as may be prescribed.

Rule Q6 The BSB shall set out in writing:

.1    the requirements to be met by an Inn in admitting student members and calling individuals to the Bar;

.2    the manner in which an Inn shall assess whether such individuals are fit and proper; and

.3         the minimum requirements for the delivery of qualifying sessions by an Inn.
  Overview 1  To ensure that only those who are fit and proper persons to practise as barristers are Called to the Bar, the Inn will undertake checks and seek declarations from each student prior to Call. The same requirement applies to those seeking re-admission. 2  Upon being Called to the Bar you will become an unregistered barrister (see Part 4K   of this Bar Qualification Manual). You will not be allowed to practise as a barrister until you have completed the final component of qualification, the work-based learning component (pupillage) (see Part 4  of this Bar Qualification Manual). 3 ...

5B: Qualifying Sessions

This section includes information on the Qualifying Sessions to be completed by student members of the Inns of Court. Bar Qualification Rules

BSB Handbook

Rule Q3 To be called to the Bar by an Inn an individual must have successfully completed the following:

.1    academic legal training;

.2    vocational training;

.3    the number of qualifying sessions as a student member of an Inn as prescribed from time to time by the BSB; and

.4    pay such fee or fees as may be prescribed.

Rule Q6 The BSB shall set out in writing:

.1    the requirements to be met by an Inn in admitting student members and calling individuals to the Bar;

.2    the manner in which an Inn shall assess whether such individuals are fit and proper; and

.3         the minimum requirements for the delivery of qualifying sessions by an Inn.
  Overview 1  Before being Called to the Bar, you must complete Qualifying Sessions which are organised by your Inn. These are professional development events of an educational and collegiate nature arranged by, or on behalf of, an Inn. From 1 September 2020, the number of sessions which must be completed prior to Call to the Bar is Ten . 2  Qualifying Sessions are designed to complement the vocational component of training and foster a community of professional practice. 3  Each Inn is responsible, in co-operation with the other Inns, for: ensuring that suitable Qualifying Sessions are ...

4K: Authorisation to practise

This section includes information on: when the term ‘barrister’ can be used; completion of the two periods of pupillage; and authorisation to practise during each period. Index for this section: 1. When can the term “barrister” be used?                2. The non-practising period of pupillage                   3. The practising period of pupillage 

1. When can the term “barrister” be used?

This section explains the important distinction between unregistered barristers and practising barristers.

  Unregistered barristers 1.1  You may become, and remain, an unregistered barrister without undertaking pupillage. The Qualification Rules allow you to be Called to the Bar after completing the vocational component of training, without having commenced pupillage. As an unregistered barrister, you can provide any legal services that are not reserved legal activities. However, there are some important rules in the BSB Handbook which you need to follow in ...

4A: Overview and structure of pupillage

This section includes information on the overall content, structure and duration of the work-based learning component of Bar training (pupillage), on third six pupillages, and on mini pupillages. Index of contents in this section: 1) What is pupillage or work-based learning? 2) Structure and duration of pupillage 3) Mini pupillages.

1. What is pupillage or work-based learning?

This section explains what pupillage or work-based learning is and where it fits into the authorised pathways to becoming a practising barrister.

  Overview 1.1  Pupillage provides work-based training in legal work under supervision. As a pupil, you will  build on prior learning and experience, as set out in our Curriculum and Assessment Strategy , in order to demonstrate (as a minimum) the competences to the threshold standard in the Professional Statement . 1.2  Pupillage is an essential component of training for the Bar. You must complete this component of training ...

4L: Exemptions and waivers (pupillage/work-based learning)

This section includes information on exemptions and waivers that may be granted from part (or all) of the work-based learning component of Bar training (pupillage). Overview 1  The rules regarding exemption from any of the individual components of Bar training are set out in the BSB Handbook at Rules Q7-Q12 . 2  In addition, Rules Q13 to Q28 cover exemptions relating to: Qualified Foreign Lawyers (QFLs) Qualified European Lawyers (QELs) Registered European Lawyers (RELs) Transferring Solicitors Teachers of the law of England and Wales Individuals who have been granted rights of audience by another Approved Regulator. 3  The types of exemptions available and the application processes are explained in Parts 7B and 7C  of this Bar Qualification Manual. Other variations ...

4M: Support and advice for pupils

This section includes information on support and advice for pupils who are facing difficulties (including bullying and harassment) and examples of good practice for AETOs to implement. We are aware that it can be very difficult for pupils to blow the whistle when things go wrong. They are in a very vulnerable position because of the competition for pupillages and do not want to jeopardise their chances of completing theirs. Many are going through pupillage as the only pupil in the AETO, which can be isolating. We know that some pupils face difficulties with behaviour of barristers and others in the AETO, quality of their training, fair distribution of work, bullying and harassment. AETOs, pupillage committees and pupil supervisors must ...

7D: The Bar Transfer Test (BTT)

This section includes information for transferring qualified lawyers on the academic and vocational assessments they may be required to complete as BTT candidates as a condition of their admission to the Bar of England and Wales. Overview 1  We have the power to exempt transferring qualified lawyers from any of the individual components of Bar training, either in full or partially. Such exemptions may be granted subject to passing certain sections of a Bar Transfer Test (BTT). 2  Formerly, the BTT comprised a series of 11 assessments split into two sections – Part A and Part B – which were designed to test the knowledge and skills required for completion of the academic and vocational components of Bar training. 3  ...

7A: Types of transferring lawyers

This section includes information on the different types of qualified lawyer who may apply for admission to the Bar of England and Wales on the basis of prior qualification(s) and experience. Overview 1  The rules regarding exemption from any of the individual components of Bar training are set out in the BSB Handbook  at Rules Q7-Q12 . 2  There are specific rules regarding exemptions granted to transferring lawyers. For details of those individuals or groups that may be entitled to Full Exemption from the components of Bar training, please see Part 7B of the Bar Qualification Manual . For details of those individuals or groups that may be entitled to Partial Exemption from the components of Bar training, please see ...

1C: Approved pathways

This section includes information on the four approved pathways to satisfy the individual components of Bar training. These pathways came into effect from 1 September 2020. 1  The three components of Bar training can be achieved by following one of the four approved training pathways: a. Three-step pathway – the academic component, followed by the vocational component, followed by the work-based learning component (pupillage). b. Four-step pathway – the academic component, followed by the vocational component in two parts, followed by the work-based learning component (pupillage). c. Integrated academic and vocational pathway – combined academic component and vocational component, followed by the work-based learning component (pupillage). d. Apprenticeship pathway – combined academic component, vocational component, and work-based learning component (pupillage). ...