Overview

Completion of the academic component will provide students with the required legal knowledge and understanding of the law of England and Wales.

Contact: Authorisations Team

A2. Completing the academic component – Qualifying Law Degrees

Overview

1          In order to complete the academic component of training based on a law degree, a student must hold a degree:

  • that is recognised as a Qualifying Law Degree;
  • that has been awarded at (or above) the minimum standard; and
  • that is not considered to be a stale qualification (see Part 2A (A6) of the Bar Qualification Manual).

2          A Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) is a ‘qualifying degree’ approved by the BSB which incorporates study of the foundations of legal knowledge subjects (see Part 2A (A1) of the Bar Qualification Manual). A qualifying degree is:

  • a degree of the required standard awarded by a United Kingdom course provider; or
  • a degree accepted by the BSB as being of an equivalent standard through the award of a Certificate of Academic Standing (see Part 2A (A4) of the Bar Qualification Manual).

3          Entry requirements for full-time undergraduate QLDs differ from one course provider to another. Further details of these requirements may be obtained from the Universities and Colleges Admission Services (UCAS). Applications for part-time undergraduate QLDs or graduate-entry law degrees (‘Senior Status’ degrees) should be made directly to the course provider.

The minimum standard

4          The minimum standard for QLDs undertaken for completion of the academic component is lower second class honours (2:2).

5          If a student has failed to meet the minimum standard in their QLD due to exceptional circumstances, they may apply to the BSB for the exercise of discretion. If discretion is granted, the student will be able to progress to the vocational component of Bar training.

6          The criteria for discretion to be exercised are:

i)     there is clear evidence that the student is academically of second class quality overall;

ii)     there is clear evidence of a temporary cause which prevented the student from fulfilling their full academic potential, which has not already been considered by the course provider in the award of the third class degree;

iii)    there is clear evidence that this cause will not render the student unsuitable to practise at the Bar; and

iv)   there is clear evidence of a motivation to qualify and practise at the Bar.

Time limits

7          The maximum time limit for completion of a QLD (studied either full-time, part-time or by distance learning) is six years.

8          If a student is unable to complete their QLD within the time limit due to exceptional circumstances, they should apply directly to their course provider for an extension of time. Course providers should apply their own assessment policies and regulations when assessing these applications.

9          Students are no longer required to apply to the BSB for acceptance of a QLD completed outside of the maximum time limit.

Credit transfer

10        A course provider may allow students to transfer credit for a QLD from another course provider without needing the approval of the BSB.

Law degrees awarded in the Republic of Ireland

11        As from September 2004, law degrees granted by universities in the Republic of Ireland are no longer regarded as QLDs for the purposes of completion of the academic component.

Commencement of the vocational component

12        Students must commence the vocational component of Bar training within five years of completion of the academic component (including any relevant re-sits).

13        In exceptional circumstances, a student may apply to the BSB for permission to commence the vocational component before completion of the academic component. An application is unlikely to be granted unless:

  1. the offer of a vocational component course place remains open despite the outstanding results;
  2. results are outstanding in no more than one subject and the subject is being taken as a first attempt;
  3. there is clear evidence from the course provider that the final overall classification of the incomplete law degree is predicted to be at (or above) the minimum standard;
  4. the result of the outstanding subject will be known by 1 October of the year in which the student commences the vocational component; and
  5. the student and their vocational component course provider accept that the student must withdraw from the course if the student does not satisfactorily complete the academic component by 1 October of the year in which the student commences the vocational component.

Early commencement of the vocational component – Application Form

Early commencement of the vocational component – Application Guidelines

As the BSB and the SRA are taking divergent approaches to qualification as barristers and solicitors, the Joint Statement will cease to apply to either profession in the future. There is more information about these changes - and what they mean if you want to become either a barrister or a solicitor - in the Common Protocol on the Academic Component of training (see Part 2A (A7) of the Bar Qualification Manual), which we have published jointly with the SRA.

In order to become a barrister, the requirement to complete the academic component of Bar training will not change. Depending on which of the approved pathways is offered by an Authorised Education and Training Organisation (AETO), this component may be integrated with the vocational component, rather than taken sequentially.

For those wishing to qualify as barristers, the current requirements will remain in force for QLD/GDL courses that start in (or before) the 2018/19 academic year and will last until students on those courses complete their studies.

2019/20 Academic Year

  • The SRA will continue to administer the academic component of education and training for solicitors and barristers on behalf of both regulators.
  • The concept of a QLD for the purpose of Bar training will no longer apply to law degree courses starting in (or after) the 2019/20 academic year.
  • The Bar will remain a graduate-only profession, with a minimum classification of lower second class honours (2:2). Students who do not meet the minimum standard must apply to the BSB for the exercise of discretion.
  • Students will be required to obtain a UK degree, awarded at Level 6 (or above) of the ‘Framework for Higher Education Qualifications’, by a recognised degree-awarding body. If this is a law degree, it must be compliant with the QAA benchmark statement for law. If the degree is in another subject, students must complete the GDL.
  • Students who do not obtain a UK degree of the required standard must verify the equivalence of their qualifications or experience by obtaining a Certificate of Academic Standing from the BSB.
  • Acceptable UK law degrees and GDL courses must cover the foundations of legal knowledge subjects and the skills associated with graduate legal work (e.g. legal research).

2020/21 Academic Year

2021/22 Academic Year

  • The SRA will cease to be involved in the approval or recognition of new QLD/CPE courses that start in or after the 2021/22 academic year, following the introduction of the Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE).
  • Subject to further detail from the SRA in due course, we intend to allow some equivalence for part-qualified solicitors. For example, we expect that passing the SQE Stage One (which incorporates knowledge of the foundations of legal knowledge subjects) should be sufficient as an equivalent to the academic component of Bar training. This, we think, should aid students in deciding what law programme to attend, meaning that they could postpone decisions on their eventual career intentions.